Traditional Seaside Towns

Make the most of the beautiful weather this summer, and plan a trip to Wales for a long weekend by the seaside. Other UK hotspots such as Brighton and Blackpool may deliver on the amusement arcades, pubs and nightclubs, but Wales is hard to beat when it comes to traditional seaside towns and villages.

If you’re seeking a quiet getaway beside the sea where you can wander cobbled backstreets, visit quaint tearooms, and enjoy strolls along untouched stretches of beach, read on for some inspiration.

Beaumaris, Anglesey

Anglesey, a large island sitting just off the coast of North Wales, is the ideal destination for a summer getaway famed for its lovely beaches, excellent seafood and historic sites. In the town of Beaumaris, on Anglesey’s eastern coast, you can enjoy an iconic seaside experience.

Explore the famous 13th century Beaumaris Castle, wander down the quaint pier (first constructed in the 19th century), and admire the Georgian and Edwardian architecture on display, before heading to the beach with an ice cream.

Nearest Welsh Rarebit Hotel: The Bull

Aberystwyth, Ceredigion

Though this charming town is famous for its university, it transforms in the summer months when the students return home and holidaymakers arrive in search of sea, sun and sand. A historic market town with a sandy stretch of beach, it’s the ideal place to take a restorative seaside holiday.

The ultimate Aberystwyth day out involves a tour of the seafront 13th century castle ruins, a wander along the Promenade, which is lined with colourful Georgian houses, and a few hours spent lounging on the beach. Aberystwyth is also the starting point for the Edwardian Vale of Rheidol Railway.

Nearest Welsh Rarebit Hotel: Gwesty Cymru 

Tenby, Pembrokeshire

One of the most picturesque seaside towns in South Wales is Tenby, which is famous for its sandy beaches, medieval walls and offshore islands. Built on a hilltop and dotted with traditional pastel-coloured cottages and Georgian mansions, Tenby is an incredibly scenic town. Spend time here and you can laze down by the water, swimming, sunbathing and soaking up the views, or get lost in the cobbled backstreets, uncovering the town’s rich medieval history.

Nearest Welsh Rarebit Hotel: St Brides Spa Hotel and Grove of Narberth

Llandudno, Conwy

This seaside town in North Wales is perhaps the most historic resort on the list. Home to a 19th century pier, an Edwardian tramway and Bronze Age mines, it’s a place steeped in centuries of history. Llandudno was a favoured resort for the Victorians, and this can be seen reflected in its beautiful waterfront promenade, grand hotels, and attractions such as the Happy Valley; public gardens built to celebrate Queen Victoria’s Golden Jubilee in 1887.

Stroll along the immaculate beach, entertain yourself with the traditional amusements at the pier, and immerse yourself in ancient history at the megalithic hillfort and ancient mines.

Nearest Welsh Rarebit Hotel: St George’s Hotel, Sychnant Pass Country House and Bodysgallen Hall & Spa

Mumbles, Swansea

This historic resort area just outside Swansea first became a holiday destination in the early 19th century after the opening of a coal railway in the region. Home to a Victorian pier, an 18th century lighthouse and a hilltop castle, Mumbles is another seaside town steeped in history.

Mumbles is also an excellent place for foodies, known for its fresh seafood, superb ice cream parlours, and world-class restaurants. Who said a seaside holiday was all about fish and chips on the beach?

Nearest Welsh Rarebit Hotel: The Corran Resort & Spa and The Cawdor

Images supplied by © Crown copyright (2018) Visit Wales

Year of Adventure – Walk the coast path

Year of Adventure – Walk the coast path 

Wales is renowned for its beautiful coastal paths and Ceredigion on the west coast is particularly extraordinary. A challenging but popular choice, the 5 mile walk from Aberystwyth to Borth offers incredible views of Cardigan Bay and surrounding areas as well as a wealth of wildlife. If you fancy walking a bit further, follow the coast an extra 5 miles to the picturesque village of Ynyslas. The sand dunes are a stark contrast to the stony beaches of Aberystwyth and provide a great place to escape for a few hours.

Another site not to be missed is Constitution Hill, an impressive feature at the northern end of Aberystwyth’s seafront. If you’re feeling too tired from the walk, take the Aberystwyth Cliff railway up to the summit to see uninterrupted views of the surrounding towns and countryside. The hillside also boasts one of the world’s largest Victoria-style camera obscura, where you can behold 100 square miles of land and seascape.

Where to stay

Situated on the Aberystwyth seafront is Gwesty Cymru, an Edwardian guesthouse with a fresh, contemporary twist. All 8 rooms, many with sea views, feature flawless interior design and specially commissioned artwork from local artist Bethan Clwyd. After a long walk along the coast, this small but perfectly formed hotel is sure to create a welcoming and comfortable environment, many of it’s rooms has a spectacular sea views.

 

Year of Adventure - walk the coast path - Aberystwyth

Room with a view, sunset Aberystwyth

What to eat

The passionate chefs at Gwesty Cymru always create sensational dishes with locally sourced ingredients. Service with a smile is at the forefront of this restaurant and they ensure to create an enjoyable atmosphere whatever the occasion. Not to be missed is the 10oz sirloin steak, served with handcut chips and a grilled tomato.

Year of Adventure - walk the coast path - Aberystwyth

Gwesty Cymru Hotel & Restaurant